The Search – 2

Each one of us is an artist.

To realize that – the words of Godard makes sense.

“Three polarities, three contradictions, three paradoxes of filmography :- visual vs narrative, fiction vs documentary & reality vs abstraction.”

Though he was talking about films, it is true for the apparently cold, unforgiving world of mathematics and science.

Take for instance, the famous equation E = mc^2 . It is a narrative as well as a visual. It began from the world of imagination flowing into the strict rationale of science and its documentation. And it portrays a fine balance between reality and abstraction.

So the apparent distinction between the different disciplines like art, science, economics, history and literature is meaningless. There is an artist as a practitioner  behind each of these.

The artist tells us a story through poems, stories, narratives, films, painting, a finely crafted argument, analysis, cold logic, drama, design etc..

We are continually telling our stories and that is what makes our world.

In that way the world and its people are enriched.

What story do you have?

Simply tell it.

 

By Dibyendu De

Author of #PowerofSee

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

The Search — 1

Most of us are in an intense search.

A search that begins with engaging with the world and with our selves.

The intention of the search is discovery, understanding, learning and knowing our selves better and better. We start that by engaging with something that attracts us.

Behind all that lies our desire to know our selves better. It is an innate but dogged search for an identity, if there is one – whatever way we choose to engage with the world.

Such a search can be fascinating, frustrating, painful and illuminating.

While engaging with the world, our emotions and cognition come into full play.

At times, they hurt. At times, they make us happy. At times, we shriek with fear.

As a result we start developing strong likes, dislikes, hatred, desires, greed that cloak our real desires and heart’s longing; making the path towards fulfillment obscure and misty. As an undesirable consequence we can quickly get disillusioned and angry with our world and angry at our selves.

It might goad us to prove to the world that we exist. Or it might force us to pretend to be something which we are not. Or we might be pushed along the path of vanity, pride, ambition and passion — mired in deep unhappiness.

We fight with the world. We fight with our selves. We fight with others. This fight would not be over till we find a resolution and come to peace within ourselves.

It might come to such a pass that we might even think of secluding ourselves from society or think of leading a cloistered life or think of total renunciation or even welcome death.

But that is not what the search is all about.

Or is it the only path that we have at our disposal?

 

To be continued…

 

By Dibyendu De

Author of #PowerofSee

When People Choose to Engage?

Here is a story shared by a good friend of mine:

When a Toyota executive asked employees to brainstorm “ways to increase their productivity”, all he got back were blank stares. When he rephrased his request as “ways to make their jobs easier”, he could barely keep up with the amount of suggestions.

This story raises many questions, which are:

1. Why did the leader get ‘blank stares’ when he asked people to find ways to increase productivity?

2. Why did people readily engage with enthusiasm when asked by their leader to find ways to make their job easier?

3. Was the leader asking the same question in two different ways?

4. Did the questions show a leader’s intention to his/her people? Is demonstration of intention vital for meaningful engagement to take place?

5. When do people choose to engage?

6. Is there a general lesson in this story that a leader can learn and consistently apply in his/her work to engage people?

7. Can the same lesson be learned by teachers to engage their students?

8. Would the lesson be useful for parents, spouses and partners?

 

Review of the book, ‘Winning Anywhere – the Power of See’ by an Architect

This is a review of my book, ‘Winning Anywhere – the Power of See’ from a young architect.

Quote:

To be precise, this book has the caliber to boost energy above the threshold level of a person to deeply see something clearly.

Much literature is available to demonstrate a way for a NEME but this book demonstrates a homogeneous way of breaking the ‘thought-mixture’ and then convert it into a fruitful thought, in a way one can feel appropriate.

Abhishek Kumar

Architect

Unquote

I am grateful to all my readers.

Thank you so much.

Note: Apart from paperback and hardcover editions, you may get the Kindle edition here: http://tinyurl.com/oxo8o75

Review of the book ‘Winning Anywhere – the Power of See’ by a Content Strategist

This review of my book, ‘Winning Anywhere – the Power of See’ is by Daniel Durrant, a well respected Content Strategist.

Quote:

Be a more perceptive leader amid complexity

+Dibyendu De guides us to see more clearly, via awareness of our selves, our intentions, and the exchanges we make within the complex adaptive systems of life. We are all learning through interactions and relationships that ‘string’ together in ways that alter the ‘tube-like’ paths we ordinarily traverse.

This book challenges us as readers to connect the dots via serendipity, filling in the gaps with our own wonderment. It contains essential pieces of discussion for those exploring the NEME (notice, engage, mull, exchange). The insights of Dibyendu are masterfully interwoven with his curation of Tagore, Gandhi, Einstein, Guru Nanak and others.

I found that to ‘see’ in the nemetics way is a form of yoga that can break us free of limiting stories. Personally, having participated in dialogues that helped fuel the production of this book, I found it a refreshing reflection on my own personal development.

I thank you Dibyendu for your unique contribution to nemetics and honoring the diversity of human perspectives/intentions that emerge from the wholeness/complexity of life. May many more of us become Maharaja— to win over our selves.

Unquote

I am grateful to my readers.

Thank you so much.

Note: Apart from paperback and hardcover editions, you may get the Kindle edition here: http://tinyurl.com/oxo8o75

No Mind and Consciousness

These days, there is lot of talk about mindfulness. Simply stated, mindfulness is the result of paying attention within a field of awareness.

Actually, awareness and attention are deeply inter-related. While awareness is about being present in a diffused field composed of different stimuli without attaching to any stimulus in particular; attention is about focusing on certain ‘stimuli’ taken from the diffused field of awareness, for varying lengths of time.

Consciousness, which encompasses attention, awareness and action; goes onto form a no-mind that goes beyond all the senses.

Though the essence of no-mind cannot be fully captured by words, an attempt can be made to describe it roughly. It is a mind that is not conditioned by the past or by the future and dwells in present, moment by moment. Therefore, it does not carry any baggage of previously stored responses, born out of our senses or lean upon the imaginative creation of the future for our senses to enjoy.

Technically speaking, no-mind is a mind that captures insights from present reality, essentially based on the principles of non permanence of anything; inter-relationship between all things and no identified self of anything (no-self). It is also about generating and choosing responses (action) based on insights gained from a given situation.

However, it seems that no-mind can be better understood through examples. And what better examples can there be other than those taken from the life of Buddha, who was one of the great practitioners of no-mind.

The story goes that one day a man came to the Buddha and asked, ”God is there, no?” Buddha replied, ”Yes.”

Then another day, another man came and asked, ”Is God really there?” To which, Buddha replied, ”No.”

Next day, a third man turned up and asked, ”Tell me whether God is there?” This time, Buddha remained silent.

On seeing three different responses of his master, his discipline and constant companion, Ananda, asked, ”How is that you gave three different replies to the same question? It is very confusing to me.”

Buddha explained, ”No, I did not give three different replies. I only responded differently to three different situations. The first person was sure that God is there. He was just asking for a confirmation. Therefore, I confirmed; since any amount of reasoning or exploration would not have helped him. He would not have accepted anything other than what he was convinced about. He had already formed his mind.”

Buddha continued, ”Similarly, the second person also had a fixed idea in his mind that God wasn’t there and was only seeking a confirmation. Hence I confirmed his strongly held belief.”

”But the third man came to me with an open mind with the sincere intention of finding out whether God existed or not. Hence I remained silent, indicating that he must explore the issue through deep and prolonged inquiry facilitated by a silent mind.” Buddha concluded.

The other story goes like this:

One day, Buddha happened to pass a man on the road who was taken in by his overwhelmingly peaceful presence.

The man stopped and asked, ”Who are you? Are you an angel or God?”

Buddha replied, ”No, I am neither an angel nor a God.”

Still curious, the man asked, ”Are you then a magician?”

This time again, Buddha answered, “No.”

”Then are you a man?” Asked the young man.

”No,” Buddha affirmed.

”Then what are you?” By this time the man was quite exasperated.

To which, Buddha replied, ”I am awake.”

Possibly, these two stories illustrate how a no-mind responds and what is the nature of no-mind.

In Buddha’s own words, no-mind is about: ”Be a lamp unto yourselves to light up thousand minds.”

Nice to Watch/Read:

a) How Meditation Can Re-shape our Brains by Sara Lazar

b) Mindfulness & Psychotherapy, 2nd Edition, Ed. Christopher Germer, Ronald D. Siegal and Paul R. Fulton

What exactly is meditation?

What is Meditation?

To begin with, meditation is the art and science of:

1) Deep relaxation; as achieved in ‘deep sleep’ phase to release gamma waves

2) Focusing the power of concentrated attention over a length of time.

3) Developing the art of reflecting the reality

4) Freeing one self from the vicious cycle of bodily feelings and thoughts that feed each other, creating mental and bodily chaos (quite often termed as diseases).

5) Enjoying creative intelligence every moment.

The different levels of meditation are as follows:

1. First level — deeply ‘relaxed mind.’ This brings down the cortisol level in the body, which in turn helps to bring down stress level to the smallest possible extent. This helps to bring down the chaos of the mind and body to a helpful level.

2. Second level — a ‘feeling mind.’ At this level we can ‘see’ the sensations that arise in the body. Pain and discomfort in the body are easy to notice at first. Later, with practice, we are also able to notice pleasure and comfort of love even in the subtlest form.

3. Third level — an ‘attentive mind.’ At this level we are able to connect different sensations and the corresponding thoughts to ‘see’ the essence of what is happening. This is the power of see or the power of concentration by which many things, we do, may be easily achieved or done with least effort and time. Helps us to be efficient in whatever we do.

4. Fourth level — a ‘silent mind.’ At this level we are able to disconnect the connections between bodily feelings and the corresponding thoughts that are generated or the thoughts that feed into the body. By this we free our selves from the vicious cycle of ever expanding thoughts and feelings that torment us. Thus we free our selves from mental sufferings. There are many benefits at this stage. However, the first is that of ‘improved health,’ – both mental and physical.

5. Fifth level — a ‘no mind.’ Having seen multiple perspectives and  having gained the ability to disconnect feelings from thoughts, we are now able to choose or select the right response or reaction for a given situation or context without falling back on old patterns of stored responses. It is also called the ‘enlightened state,’ of effectively engaging with the world.

6. Sixth level — a ‘zero mind.’ This is a state of complete merger with deep consciousness, which is generally available only in the ‘deep sleep’ state. (Those who take a high dose of medication and psychiatric medicines do not enter and enjoy this state at all in their sleep). This is the state of highest consciousness and intelligence. Everything seems to happen magically and effortlessly as demanded by a situation. We learn and unlearn effortlessly. We live and enjoy the joy of creative intelligence moment by moment or our existence. We are one with our true self.

Nice to read:

1. Gamma waves:

2. Brain behind Gut decisions: